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Mohican/Pequot/Mohegans first Village.

In the beginning

Mohican/Pequot/Mohegans first Village. | Uncasvillage indexpage. | United States Visitors | Visitors around the world | Burial. | Walkingfox Speaks | Pequot/Mohegan's | Alters | Pipe. | Circle | Smudging | PAW-PAUS | The Storey Clan | WebLinks | Spiritulism
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                                               Grand entry (our church)

Back before first contact we the American Natives from the Eastern woodland tribes had what we called a PAW-PAUS (church).

Because of first contact (threats of assimilation) and the lack of non native understanding our ancestors changed the gathering and the name to Pow-Wow (meaning the wicked ones) which now allowed non natives a look see!

Why is it so hard to understand that Eastern woodland American natives wish for the same respect when it involves our Grand entry and a precious few other dances?

No traditional elder wishes to be mean, we have explained that most of our people attending this entry do so with many sacred medicines and or possessions some believe should not be recorded!

Please come and enjoy a traditional American gathering we, the elders, would love to teach and guide you through-out and will ever enjoy a dance or two with you.

 

To some native peoples of northeastern North America, a 'powwow' was originally a man with special abilities to cure or offer advice from the spirit world, a wizard, witch, and magician as explained earlier.

Everyone is welcome at Powwows!

At times there is an entry fee to help pay for the drum, electricity, insurance and so on and you will often find a wide variety of  American native crafts, trade goods and food for sale; even demonstrations and storytelling as well.

It's a great place for your entire family to spend the day.

Drugs and alcohol are not permitted; pets must be on a leash at all times, like at all Paw-paus some powwows invite pets into a circle because Grandfather is Creator of all!

The spiritual center or heart of a Powwow is THE CIRCLE; a place to be respected and honored, it is a sacred place that is blessed by Creator through a spiritual leader not by any person. The circle is entered only from the East (where there is an opening) and dancers travel in the same direction as the sun.

The singing is a gift and prayer to the Creator; and the drum is the heartbeat of our People. The singers and drummers together are called THE DRUM.

 

Ceremonies start with a "Grand Entry" of the dancers to pay respects to our Creator and to greet one another. Honoring songs, and dances for veterans and our ancestors and a prayer follows. You will be asked to stand and remove your hat for these ceremonies if you can.

Please don't take photos or videos if you're asked not to do so; and please don't touch the clothing or personal belongings of anyone in American native dress.

Much of what is worn is sacred, expensive and irreplaceable, but do feel free to ask if you want to take individual pictures, or if you have a question about a particular item that someone is wearing.

Most traditional Native People will be pleased to assist you if they're asked first.

 

You will see many types of dances at a Powwow. When you hear a 'Round Dance' or sometimes it is called a friendship dance announced, EVERYONE will be invited to participate, so proceed to the East door of the circle and join in.

A  Round (Friendship) dance is easy to learn and fun to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 Moon Ceremony to become a Clan Grandmother is a sacred ceremony for Eastern woodland American native tribes to strengthen and insure their royal families.

Eastern Woodland American Native Clan is defined as a group of people usually related by family ties, and under the leadership of a matriarch the Clan is based on a matrilineal system.

They have Clan Grandmothers and Grandfathers, (13 mood ceremony) as well as Clan Mothers and Clan Fathers.

The Clan Grandmother is the keeper of the sacred medicine bundle from which the Clan derives its right of existence in most traditional Native American Clans, and who, in conjunction with the Clan Mothers, generally has the authority to set policy for the Clan as a whole.

The Clan Grandfather carries the Clan name and who, in conjunction with the Clan Fathers, is generally responsible for ensuring that the policies established by the Clan Grandmother are implemented at the well of the Sachem.

A person can also be adopted into a clan.

Clan adoption is an almost universally accepted means of admitting "outsiders" and helps in the preservation of the tribe.

The word clan comes from the time of the Vikings trade visit and family mixings long before Christopher Columbus came to our shores, the Europeans also have clans.

 

  What is an American native Powwow (Paw-paus)?

If you wish after you finish enjoying this page

please feel free to come and enjoy our pages

about traditional American native

events like our powwows.

 

http://home.earthlink.net/~sachemuncas/powwows/

 

03/12/2008

Lately I have been enjoying reading the questions that people seem to want answers to as they come to my web sites, many very good questions that I would be happy to answer only I have no way of doing so unless you write to me, so if you what my answers to your questions please write to me at

ussbetelgeuse@earthlink.net

or

sachemuncas@earthlink.net

 

 

I have been getting letters from all over the world and am answering them as quickly as possible.

I believe that some letters should even be answered on this web page for all to see.

Gary asks, “I have a picture of your Sachem Uncas on my site, I found the picture in the Cooper book, is it a correct likeness to Uncas”?

 

 

 

 WELCOME TO MY SITE’s

If you came to my site and are in a hurry and looking for my Ancestor Sachem Unkas (Uncas) please start here

http://www.sachem-uncas.com/history.html

Or

http://www.sachem-uncas.com/villages.html

Please come back soon.

 

However, welcome come stay awhile I hope that you enjoy your stay.

 

 

 

 

 

Tobacco gift

How and when to present a gift of tobacco to an American native?

Any and every time that one wishes to speak with another it should be

honored by a native tobacco (Kicnic-kicnic) gift.

 

Naming Ceremony Protocol

First and the most important thing would be to make sure that you are an American native, to find this out ask an elder.

The traditional way to make a request to receive your American native name is to give a gift of tobacco, as the request is made, to the person you are requesting the name from. You and your family must also plan a meal or "feast" to celebrate after the Naming Ceremony is completed. If others are receiving their names, the covered dishes will be shared.

 

Present a gift of tobacco from your left hand to the left hand of the individual you are wishing to receive a name from this means heart to heart.

 This person should be a person you respect and must be someone who is an American native elder from the nation that you are requesting a name from.

Personally ask if you may make a request of this person, either in person, by phone or e-mail.

Receive this individual's consent to allow you to make a request.

Honor a male and a female with tobacco and request that they stand with you as sponsors at the ceremony. These should be individuals who have made a significant impact in your life and are familiar with that American native nation.

Naming ceremony is held in a prayer circle with a fire, both of which must be properly prepared. (Honor the prayer circle with appropriate attire and attitudes. Regalia should be worn if available.)

Give thanks to the Creator and all the sponsors.

 
 

 

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Cauchegan Rock

Cochegan rock named by European settlers/Cauchegan Rock the true Mohegan name has been over looked for many years now and I liked it that way.  Cauchegan rock (named after a Mohegan relation family of mine that first lived in the village) is the largest rock in Mohegan land.

The unique setting of the rock was the main reason that it was used so often as a meeting place by Uncas and his followers.

In the spring and for most of the summer, the tribe used it and the land around it, for one of their many villages. Often times, the trees would be used where they stood, to form long and roundhouses. The village was surrounded by fresh water for drinking, gardening, washing, etc., while, the nearby Pequot River provided an abundant supply of fish and clams. The Fox River has now been diverted and used elsewhere by housing development!

My Grandfather told me that the tribe would often put tables and chairs on top of Cauchegan rock when they held their meetings. This would also allow them to see anyone coming towards them from great distances, friend or foe. In the colder weather, the tribe would use the rocks and trees in the area to shelter them from the winds. The warmer weather it was a good place for gardening.

The first Pau-was of the new season would begin at the rock with fellowshipping, before going on to the Great River, the Quinatucquet River, to Pau-was with other tribes.

I have always wondered if it would not be more beneficial for one non-profit organization to share this land with other non-profit organizations and all true native elders.

This very sacred land is now being used to help young men learn about and enjoy Mother Earth.

However, every time someone talks to me about their trip to this Sacred Mohegan Land,

the first thing that they mention is the littering. Why not share the land with our elders, as well as with the Cub Scouts, Brownies and Girl Scouts? In this way, more people would be available to help clean it up, and be taught how to show respect for Mother Earth, while keeping it out of the hands of those who would shame Uncas and all of the Ancestors, by turning it into just another tourist attraction.

Attention/Now for an update,

The Sachem Uncas sacred prayer rock village has been turned over to the casino Indians so now we shall see just how long the Ancestors of New England Woodland American Natives beloved Cauchegan Rock village can remain a sacred Mohegan prayer place?

Aquine,

Sachem Walkingfox

 

 aprayerrock1.jpg

 

 

 

 

"Spirituality is not religion to American Natives.

Religion is not a Native concept, it is a non Native word,

with implications of things that often end badly,

like Holy wars in the name of individuals God's and so on.

Native people do not ask what religion another Native is,

because they already know the answer.

To Native people, spirituality is about the Creator, period~"

                                          

 

 

 

 

 

Uncas Village

After their split from the Pequot’s, Sachem Uncas and his followers settled on land close to the areas that they had used for fishing, hunting and clamming. The village was also close to the Uncas Leap Falls.

Elders Village

The Elders village was used by Sachem Uncas to protect the southern end of his main village. Following their departure from the Pequot tribe and before the Pequot’s were completely annihilated by their neighbors, the villages of Uncas were under constant attack by his father-in-law, Sachem Sassacus. After the Pequot’s were eventually destroyed, the Mohegan’s were then attacked by the old enemies of Sassacus. Uncas took some of his best warriors and trusted elders and began using the area which is now the Mohegan Church, as a mini village overlooking the river. After each battle, Uncas always gave a captured brave the option of being set free or becoming a member of this mini Village.

Cauchegan Rock Village

During the time of Sachem Uncas, most Eastern Woodland Indians built Round and Long houses at choice locations on Mother Earth. These houses were permanent, but the people moved according to the seasons. One of these premium locations was the area surrounding Cauchegan Rock.

Indian Leap Falls

The location where Sachem Uncas leaped to safety while being chased by his enemies(the Narragansett’s from RI). Following this event, these same warriors chose to leap to their deaths rather than be captured by Uncas and his men. An alter was later built at this site and it then became a place of prayer for Native Americans.

Royal Burial grounds

Reflecting the great importance of Indian Leap Falls, the Sachems choose an area nearby as a place of burial for the Royal families.

Turtle Hill Village

This village was a regular stopping place between the Pequot River and Cauchegan Rock after the Mohegan’s had been out berry picking, fishing or swimming, also with an alter and Royal burial ground.

What and where is this Turtle hill?

I find it hard to believe that throughout all of these years with so many new INDIANS in New England not one has tried to stake a claim to the 2nd most important place in Mohegan land since just after the split from the parent family of Pequot’s.

The elders teach that our ancestors had to place braves on turtle hill (sometimes called Turtle Island) because the new enemy Pequot’s and old enemies Narragansett’s and Tariateans used the Pequot river crossing in that spot to attack this new group of people.

The ancestors also used this area as a good resting place while traveling from the Pequot river, the ocean and the elder villages, now called New London, Waterford, Quaker hill Montville and Norwich, on the way back to our main village of Cauchegan.

Because it is believed that our 1st Sachem’s father is buried under this alter on the hill I had to swear on this alter not to divulge the whereabouts of this very sacred place.

Unlike our prayer rock (Cauchegan village) I will never allow greed to pollute this land, I only write this because I wish for all traditional American Natives “please add this land to your already long prayer list” to Grandfather Creator!

AHO

 

The Trading Post

Uncas befriended a colonist and gave him some land to set up a trading post because of the problems with past enemies and the new problems with the colonists. After this gift, he had more favorable contact with the colonists and an even better warning system in place for the protection of his villages.

The Pequot River

The Pequot River was a vital part of the defensive strategy for Sachem Uncas and his people. It was the very life blood of the Tribe, being used for food, transportation and the defense of their homes.

 

The holidays are coming around again; this is the time when I start reminiscing about the Ancestors (anyone that has crosses from my Pequot/Mohegan past).

I am not talking about James Fedamore Coopers fiction movie (the Last of the Mohican) about an inadequate resemblance to our Sachem Uncas, I am not even talking about all for the wannabe’s that showed up after our money hungry politicians turn our land over to the mob (casinos),

I am talking about real honest to goodness American Native people.

I wonder how many American Native people through-out Indian country have lost their pray places since first contact?

I am guessing that it would be easier to check on how many did not lose a prayer place?

Whatever happened to the rest of our Royal burial grounds, The Mohegan trading post, The Pequot River, Turtle Hill Village and Indian leap falls alter? What about Cauchegan Rock and Cauchegan village?

 
 

Sachem Uncas

 

 

 

Kiehtan, Woonand and Cantantowit are Eastern Woodland American Native words for Creator

As described in this as well as many other old books of our past history.

 

Wadsworth or Charter Oak

By

W.H. Gocher

“The traditions of a nation are part of its existence”—Disraeli

Hartford, Conn.

Published by W.H. Gocher-1904

 

 

http://www.quinnipiac.edu/other/abl/etext/Wadsworth/wadsworthcomplete2.html

 

 

104

The Suckiag Indians, who were here when what they called the big canoes with white wings were first seen on the river, and from whom the Hooker company purchased the site of Hartford, asked Will­iam Gibbons to spare it, as in addition to being a landmark the oak was the peace tree of the tribe.

The sachem Sequassen said that the tree was planted by the great sachem who led his people from the land of the setting sun as a pledge of per­petual peace with those whom they found here and from whom they received the land. At the planting their tomahawks1 were buried under it and the acorn adopted as their totem. For centuries the Suckiag Indians lived in peace, fishing in the great river and its branches and hunting in the forest, while the squaws and the old men planted the corn and beans which Kiehtan sent them from the southwest. Ac­cording to the Indian tradition, the corn2 was

1 The English, when adopting the name of the Indian hatchet, called it tom-my-hawk. The Indians say tume-hegan, the e being short, and scarcely sounded, with the short sound of a and the h has a full aspirate as hee. The gn is sounded short. This word is com­pounded of the Indian verb tume-ta-mun, to cut, and the noun hegun, a sharp cutting instrument. In com­pounding this word half of the verb is clipped off and joined with the noun. 'The Southern Indians have the following tradi­tion concerning the origin of corn, beans and tobacco: "Two youths, while pursuing the pleasures of the chase, were led to an unfrequented part of the forest, where, being fatigued and hungry, they sat down to


105 brought by the sacred blackbird and the bean bv the crow, the former being first seen in the slender branches of the peace tree when the leaves were the size of a mouse's ear, and by this they fixed the time for placing the corn in the ground.

As the generations of Indians were gathered to their long sleep, the oak increased in size and was known as a landmark and meeting place for all the tribes on the river. In the fourth generation before the coming of the white man, Wawanda, the sach­em's favorite wife, bore him male twins, and in the year of their birth a sprout appeared on the north­east side of the oak. It was permitted to remain, and as the boys, who were named Saweg- and No-washe, each of them being given a portion of their

rest themselves and to dress their victuals. While they were in this employ the spirit of the woods, at­tracted by the savory smell of the venison, approached them in the form of a beautiful female and seated her­self beside them. The youths, awed by the presence of so superior a being, presented to her in the most respectful manner a share of their repast, which she was pleased to accept, and eat with satisfaction. The repast being finished, the female spirit informed them that if they would return to the same place after the revolution of twelve moons they would find something which would recompense their kindness, disappeared from sight. The youths returned at the appointed time and found that upon the place on which the right arm of the goddess had reclined a stalk of corn had sprung up; under her left, a stalk of beans, and from the spot on which she had been seated was growing a flourishing plant of tobacco."


106

father's name, Sawashe, grew in years, the sprout became a twig and finally a branch as large as a man's arm. In this limb the powwows and a few of the sagamores saw the sign of a split in the tribe. At different times they urged its removal, but Sa-washe, proud of the skill and rugged strength of the twin brothers, although they were almost oppo-sites in disposition, would never consent, as he be-lieved that the great father Kiehtan1 placed it there

1The Connecticut Indians believed in one great and invisible Deity, who was known in the different tribes as Kiehtan, Woonand and Cantantowit. The Indians placed the dwelling of Kiehtan in the southwest be-cause the wind from that quarter is the warmest and pleasantest that blows in this climate and usually brings fair weather. They also believed that the soul existed after death and that the spirits of the good would go to the house of Kiehtan. Then they would be delivered from sorrow and enjoy pleasures similar to those which they had indulged in here, only in abundance and in perfection. They also believed that the wicked would go to the door of Kiehtan and knock for admittance; but upon his telling them to go away, they would be obliged to wander forever in a state of horror and discontent. The Narragansett In-dians believed that Cantantowit made a man and woman of stone, but not liking them he broke them to pieces and made another pair of wood, from whom all human beings were descended. Another tribe, when questioned as to their creation, said that two squaws were once wading in the sea; the foam touched their bodies and they became pregnant; one brought forth a boy and the other a girl; the two squaws then died and their children became the progenitors of the hu-man race.-Massachusetts Historical Collections, Vol. III., and De Forest's History of Indians of Connecti-cut.

 

 

 

 

History of the Indians of Connecticut from the Earliest Known Period to 1850

 By John William De Forest, Felix Octavius

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=4OwNAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq=Kiehtan&source=web&ots=7OyDVzEjML&sig=oE047Cz9fm6sphtk-55ZPVNOscA&hl=en&ei=gAmXSYKuNMyatwejp8iwCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=6&ct=result#PPP1,M1

Page#23

 

 

The Plymouth Colony Archive Project

http://www.histarch.uiuc.edu/plymouth/goodnews7.html

 

Good Newes from New England
Chapter 7, 1624

A few things I thought meet to add hereunto, which I have observed amongst the Indians, both touching their Religion, and sundry other Customs amongst them. And first, whereas my self and others, in former Letters (which came to the Press against my will and knowledge) wrote, that the Indians about us are a people without any Religion, or knowledge of any God, therein I erred, though we could then gather no better: For as they conceive of many divine powers, so of one whom they call Kiehtan, to be the principal and maker of all the rest, and to be made by none: He (they say) created the heavens, earth, sea, and all creatures contained therein. Also that he made one man and one woman, of whom they and we and all mankind came: but how they became so far dispersed that know they not. At first they say, there was no Sachem, or King, but Kiehtan, who dwelleth above in the Heavens, whither all good men go when they die, to see their friends, and have their fill of all things: This his habitation lyeth far West-ward in the heavens, they say; thither the bad men go also, and knock at his door, but he bids them Quatchet, that is to say, Walk abroad, for there is no place for such; so that they wander in restless want and penury: Never man saw this Kiehtan; only old men tell them of him, and bid them tell their children, yea, to charge them to teach their posterities the same, and lay the like charge upon them. This power they acknowledge to be good, and when they would obtain any great matter, meet together, and cry unto him, and so likewise for plenty, victory, etc. sing, dance, feast, give thanks, and hang up Garlands and other things in memory of the same.

 

 

 

Uncas and his Bolton friendship

 

UNCAS AND MIANTINOMO

by Hans DePold, town historian

(June 2008)

Uncas was indeed the embodiment of the wise sachem (chieftain) that James Fenimore Cooper described in his book, "The Last of the Mohicans." But unlike Cooper's sachem, Uncas did not live in the 18th century in upstate New York; he lived right here in the Thames River basin in the 17th century. And Uncas was not the last Mohegan—he was the first.

The success of Uncas and the Mohegan tribe led to great change in the region's power structure. With the help of the Mohegans, the English triumphed against the Dutch and Connecticut was at peace from Indian wars. The Mohegan tribe became the unrivalled native power during colonial times. And Uncas was responsible for the Mohegans surviving as a sovereign nation. He played a major part of Bolton's heritage and is a symbol of the very best of our Native American heritage. Thanks in part to Uncas, the four essential virtues of Native American spirituality survived: respect for a Supreme Being, respect for Mother Earth, respect for one's fellow man, and respect for individual freedom.

A British writer named Patrick M'Robert in his letters of 1774 and 1775 described the ancient inhabitants of America: "These are tall, nimble, well-made people; many of them about six feet high, with long black hair, their complexion a little tawny, or copper-colored; their eyes black and piercing, their features good, especially the women."

It is said that most Connecticut Native Americans believed in one Supreme Being, who was known in the different tribes as Kiehtan, Woonand and Cantantowit. They placed the dwelling of Kiehtan in the southwest because the wind from that quarter is the warmest that blows in Connecticut and usually brings fair weather. They also believed that the soul existed after death and that the spirits of the good would go to the house of Kiehtan. There they would be delivered from pain and sorrow and enjoy an afterlife similar to that which they had here, only in abundance and in perfection. They believed that when the wicked went to the door of Kiehtan he would tell them to go away and they were obliged to wander alone and lost forever.

Uncas was exceptional and showed by his actions that he loved not only his people, but also cared about his defeated enemies and even admired the English. When overpowered by his enemies, he either turned his other cheek to avoid conflict or he turned the tables on them. He created the sovereign Mohegan nation. And in that nation he was first in friendship, first in his word of honor, and first in stability and dependability. He was a Mohegan rock. In fact the word sachem, as Uncas was called, means "rock man" and in Mohegan they would say, "Ne-woe-me-suns-mo," which means, "Are you going to the rock?"

Miantinomo, sachem of the Narragansett in Rhode Island, was still filled with hatred for the Pequot whom he helped defeat. He became envious of the growing influence of Uncas and began to engage in numerous attacks against the Mohegan homeland of Moheganeak.

The Mohegan, the Mohawk, and the Narragansett had sided with the English during the Pequot War. No Native American tribes supported the Pequot who started that war. But now the Pequot survivors had been adopted into the Mohegan tribe and the hatred that Miantinomo felt for the Pequot was unfairly transferred to Uncas and the Mohegans. The Hartford General Court on October 12, 1643 noted that the Mohegan tribe under Uncas's leadership was a critically important ally to the English. The court offered some English ironclad soldiers to help the Mohegans defend against the harassing Narragansett raids.

This eventually led in 1644 to a war known as the Battle of the Great Plains. It required a large open field east of what is now Norwich, where Uncas would let the great Narragansett sachem proudly array his overwhelming army of warriors. As it happens, it was also a place where the Mohegan bow and arrow would be effective on a very large scale. Miantinomo typically attacked with upward of 700 warriors. While Uncas sometimes maintained as many as 500 warriors, they were primarily defensive and spread thinly through Moheganeak. Uncas usually led between 100 and 200 elite warriors into battle. The Mohegan warriors were the best and brightest warriors from all the other nations because Uncas welcomed all nations, offered the greatest freedom, and upheld the Native American traditions and virtues.

The Mohegans were greatly outnumbered by the Narragansett but Uncas had a plan. Uncas would ask Miantonomo to fight him single handed in mortal combat in the open field. He told his warriors that when Miantonomo refused to fight him, Uncas would drop to the ground and that would be the signal for the Mohegan warriors to fire all their arrows at the Narragansett warriors.

When Uncas fell to the ground as though he were dead, the Narragansett were startled and confused. Volleys of arrows struck the Narragansett but carefully missed the area where Uncas and Miantinomo were. The plan worked and most of the Narragansett warriors were finished off within a minute. Then the Mohegans attacked in hand-to-hand combat.

Miantonomo ran for his life but was run down by the Mohegan warrior Tantaquidgeon and brought back to Uncas. Then the mighty Mohegan sachem Uncas, with a great number of his bravest warriors and wisest and most trusted advisors (sagamores), brought Miantonomo through Bolton to the colonial commissioners in the Hartford colony.

Fearful of continual agitation among the native tribes, the New England colonies had established a regional commission to deal with relations with the tribes, as well as trade and other issues. These Commissioners of the United Colonies decided to hand Miantinomo back to be executed in Mohegan lands by his captor Uncas, thus avoiding any direct conflict between the Narragansett and English. Subsequently, Miantonomo was slain quickly by Uncas's brother Wawequa when they arrived back in Bolton Notch.

        The body of Miantinomo, with a hatchet buried in the back of his head, was never found and it is said that his spirit still wanders alone and lost along the Mohegan trails through Bolton.

 

Mohegan youths and their leader participating in a powwow on the Bolton town green in 1920 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the founding of Bolton. Mary Gleason Sumner appears to be the third person on the leader's left. Photo courtesy Genevieve Robb

 

 squawcavetn2.jpg

 

 

SQUAW CAVE

The black hole to my left is more than man-sized and seems to extend far back into the notch before turning out of sight. This is one of the three caves we have found and there could be six cave entrances altogether. In the summer, if you do not know where it is, you could walk within 20 feet of this immense entrance without seeing it. Even in winter, it cannot be seen from the highway, about the cave and Wunnee and Peter Hager.

GHOSTS OF BOLTON PAST AND PRESENT

by Hans DePold, town historian

(February & June, 2003)

A few years ago I was telling a Hartford Courant writer about a Bolton Quarryville ghost story. I told her we had left out stories about the ghosts of Bolton for fear they could affect the Bolton real estate market. She explained that ghosts are no problem. Her house in Mansfield was haunted until she told the ghost he frightened her and she wished he would stop appearing. He never appeared again! Ghosts are described as being in a state of denial, unable to accept the fact that they have died and should move on. You'd think they would notice their clothing was very much out of fashion.

If you encounter a ghost or a ghostly phenomenon in Bolton, keep your wits about you. But before you read further, are your doors and windows locked? Are all the lights on? Are you sitting in the middle of your bed with your feet off the floor so that if something is below the bed it can't pull you under?

The Gay City ghost town rested at the south side of Bolton. It was begun about 1796 by a religious order whose members believed in serving the male members whiskey before their two weekly services. This promoted good attendance and tended to enliven the meetings. Their preacher did not preach Puritan hell and brimstone; no, he was always in good spirits. The religious order built a channel where water is said to have flowed uphill from a pond to a waterwheel that powered their mills. That frightened some workers away. Many strange things occurred in Gay City, where they made such good fun of Puritan preaching that the regular Bolton folk generally stayed away. Abandoned by the religious order shortly after the War of 1812, the mills continued to be operated until fires mysteriously burned everything to the ground. Today, Gay City State Park has one of Bolton's favorite swimming holes at the site of the pond built to collect the water that flowed uphill.

Now to the ghosts of Notch Hollow... What causes the seeming rapid weather changes that occur just at the Notch? Drivers have reported their car windows misting over and sometimes freezing solid white as they pass over the abandoned railroad line in the deepest part of the Notch. I know that to be a fact for it has happened more than once to my family. Who watches over the painted rock? Who painted the flag there after 9-11? Who puts the Christmas tree and flag up on the rock? Whose eerie voice is heard singing up on the rocks when the moon moves across the sky on some lonely summer nights? There are ghostly stories of quarrymen, the Dutchman, and Chief Miantinomah, all of whom died untimely deaths in Notch Hollow.

Former Bolton historian Larry Larned showed me that of the 26 Notch Hollow buildings that still existed as late as 1913 only one remains today. Notch Hollow is now a specter of the past, a part of old Quarryville that no longer exists. Most people now call it Bolton Notch from the deep trench left by more than 200 years of quarrying. But in the 1600s the Mohegan Indians knew the area to be the highest land in the region, dominated by an enormous sacred flat rock, Wiashguagwumsuck, at the northwestern border of their territory.

Intermarriage in the Massachusetts Bay colony was illegal. The first recorded untimely death at Wiashguagwumsuck was that of Peter Hager, a young Dutchman who lived there with his Podunk Indian wife Wunnee in a cave on the southwest side. Peter was fatally wounded at Wiashguagwumsuck but his body has never been found. Later, in 1643, at the conclusion of the Pequot war with the British, Mohegan Chieftain Uncas had his prisoner, the Pequot Chief Miantinomah, executed as they passed sacred Wiashguagwumsuck. Miantinomah's body, with a tomahawk protruding out the back of its skull, also has never been found. Quarrying also claimed several lives over the years. These are all possible suspects in the old Notch ghost tales.

The railroad executives built a clubhouse for themselves and their influential friends at the west end of Notch Hollow. The trains would stop there when signaled, as well as at the usual stop at the station in the Notch. Steam from the train would condense and in the winter sometimes frosted over nearby windows. The story goes that four lawyers who were wheeling and dealing in the booming thread mill industry had met at the clubhouse to strategize. A big hulking man entered from the howling snowstorm and silently stood before the fire rubbing his enormous hands, trying to warm himself. They could not see his face but worried that the stranger may have heard some of their schemes and wondering if he was from Willimantic, they demanded, "Where are you from, sir?" Suddenly the room was as cold as all outdoors. The man spun around, and with eyes like burning coals he snarled, "From Hell, where you four are going." Then he threw open the door and disappeared back into the swirling snow and was never seen again.

The ghost train has been reported in many places along both abandoned and operating rail lines. The legend says that the ghost train's steam, wheels, and carriages make not a single sound as they sweep along on invisible rails. Sometimes people in Bolton have seen a white steamy mist sweep down the greenway trail as though it was from an old ghostly steam train. Could the sudden condensation on car windows in the summer, and the sudden winter frosting over of car windows as they cross the abandoned rail line at the Notch, be caused by the steam of Bolton's passing ghost train?

Martin Luther, the Catholic priest who started the Reformation, one night threw a bottle of ink at a ghost. Today you can visit his room and still see the ink splatter on the wall. But today, seeing ghosts doesn't look good on your job resume, unless perhaps your name is Ed or Lorraine Warren. This husband and wife team of ghost hunters, most associated with the Amityville horrors, has recently visited Bolton.

The January 2001 meeting of the Bolton Historical Society brought out spontaneous discussion of the past and present ghosts of Bolton. One house in town boasts of a ghost who is dressed as a soldier who sometimes descends the staircase on moonlit nights. Residents of another house have seen a Civil War-era woman wearing an outfit complete with hoop skirt and bonnet. Still another house has unexplained old gravestones in the walkway around the house.

But the most recent story is that of recent Bolton homebuyers who purchased a historic home and decided to have it checked out by the well-known ghost hunters, Ed and Lorraine Warren. The jaw of the real estate agent dropped when she met them. The Warrens walked all around the house, and then suddenly Lorraine stopped and said she felt something strange in the sitting room. She told everyone to wait outside and she went in and closed the door behind her. The hair on the back of the homebuyer's neck stood up. Lorraine then emerged from the room and said there was no ghost but a presence. The owners later learned that the previous owner, an elderly woman, spent much of her time in that room before she died.

Perhaps these stories have unsettled you or perhaps one of them seems close to home and you suddenly noticed your clothing is very much out of fashion. For those Bolton ghosts reading this over your shoulder right now, I leave this Irish blessing, "May you be three days in heaven before the devil knows you're dead!"

 

 

 

(April 2003)

GHOSTS OF BOLTON, Part 2

After reading my article on the ghosts of Bolton in the last issue of the Bolton Community News, Sue Gorton sent me a poem she wrote long ago which suggests that the American Indian maiden Wunnee could be behind many unexplained pranks and other happenings in Bolton. Sue and Bob Gorton lived on Brandy Street, and for many years Bob was the chairman of the Bolton Planning Commission. Although Sue now lives in Bloomfield, she still attends St. George Episcopal Church on Boston Turnpike, and maintains many ties with Bolton. In her clever poem she mentions some familiar names: Doc Olmsted, Kris Pelletier, Grant Davis, Tom and Marilee Manning, Ray Halsted, and Phil and Pat Dooley. BOMARCO stands for Bolton Married Couples, a social club in town. Thank you, Sue, for allowing me to use your poem.

A little background information first for those unfamiliar with this famous Bolton legend: Wunnee and the young Dutchman Peter Hager were married in an Indian ceremony but became outcasts because intermarriage was not accepted in the Massachusetts Colony. Connecticut and Bolton did not exist when they settled in what became Bolton. Colonists fatally wounded Peter but he made it back to Wunnee to die in the cave that was their home at Bolton Notch.

The Ghost of Bolton Notch

by Sue Gorton

An Indian maiden named Wunnee

Was in love with a Bolton man.

Folks cried "Miscegenation!"

And said "Your wedding is banned!"

So maid and lover ran away

Pursued by the biased lot.

They fled to the east and lived in a cave

In the hills at Bolton Notch.

The man was wounded by the crowd

(I think that he was shot.)

She nursed him with skill but still he died

In the cave at Bolton Notch.

The maiden was never seen again

Though long the crowd did watch.

They say she's still there to this day

In the cave at Bolton Notch.

She does come out from time to time

With revenge for the wedding they botched.

She isn't mean, just troublesome.

That Ghost of Bolton Notch.

The ghost is seen on Hallowe'en

In the graveyard on the hill.

Doc Olmsted across the road just might

Draw shades and write his will.

Kris was working on a quilt

With her fabrics divided by swatch.

All her blues were turned to pinks

By the Ghost of Bolton Notch.

She took Grant's hammer up a tree

And hid it in a crotch.

This is the sort of mischief done

By the Ghost of Bolton Notch.

The Mannings we know are singers,

Both Tom and Marilee.

The Ghost has been known to hide their books.

They must sing from memory.

Ray Halsted disassembled

A precious antique watch.

One of the gears just disappeared

With the Ghost of Bolton Notch.

Sue was doing calligraphy when

The ink fell out in a blotch!

This catastrophe could only be

By the Ghost of Bolton Notch.

She went to a party at the Dooleys'.

Changed all the wine to scotch.

BOMARCO then was plastered by

The Ghost of Bolton Notch.

 

 

 

 

UNCAS HELPS TONTONIMO

by Hans DePold, town historian

(August 2008)

By working with the colonists, the Mohegan "sachem" ( (chieftain) Uncas became a friend and advisor valued for his wisdom and peacekeeping abilities. This gave him sovereignty and power to manage many Indian affairs. Bolton is honored to have such a wise and compassionate leader in our heritage.

The Mohawk from New York were gradually relinquishing peacekeeping in Connecticut to Uncas. (Earlier, the Mohawk enemies of the Pequot had sent the head of Pequot sachem Sassacus, Uncas's brother-in-law, as a gift to the Hartford Court.)

The Nowashe tribe occupied the area that is now part of Glastonbury. They were neighbors of the Podunk, who occupied what is now East Hartford and Manchester as far as Bolton Notch. The Nowashe refused to pay a small token to the tiny party of Mohawk who came from the Hudson Valley and entered the Connecticut Valley every two years to collect tribute for keeping tribal peace. The Nowashe said they were not fat from the corn grown by women in the fields nor were they foolish like their neighbors. They said they were strong hunters and built their fort on high ground. Their enemies would be weakened climbing over obstacles before they could reach their fort and fight. They said they no longer needed or wanted the Mohawk or the Mohegan as peacekeepers in Connecticut. A year passed and the surrounding tribes began to wonder if they, too, should refuse to pay tribute to the Mohawk for enforcing the tribal peace.

The Mohawk made a sudden, unannounced trip to the Connecticut Valley and borrowed many canoes from the river tribes. The main force waited upstream on the west side of the river and ate and prepared for war while a small advance guard walked inland and then south before crossing the river that night in canoes and landing near where Podunk (also called Nowaas) and Nowashe lands met at the Connecticut River. The small Mohawk advance guard was seen that night destroying a teepee and crops near the Nowashe fort and leaving on the same trail leading back up the other side of the Connecticut River.

The Nowashe knew they could crush the small force of Mohawk warriors so they dispatched many of their best warriors to track and kill them. But the trail ended far north at the river and the Nowashe trackers could see that a large Mohawk force had camped there the previous night. Meanwhile, the Mohawk had canoed downriver to the Nowashe camp and smoke could be seen rising where the Nowashe fort was overrun and burned to the ground. The Nowashe warriors who had tracked the Mohawk ran all the way back to their fort. The fastest arrived first and the slowest came much later to be slaughtered by the Mohawk.

The Mohawk destroyed the Nowashe tribe except for a few who were not found. The Podunk and the Mohegan adopted the few survivors. Some shocked survivors told all who would listen of the horrible deeds and ferocity of the Mohawk and put fear in the hearts of all the tribes along the river.

Not long after that attack Uncas and Tontonimo, the Podunk sachem, shared a difficult problem. A Podunk warrior named Weassapano murdered a Mohegan "sagamore" (sagamores were very wise warriors who were often sub-chiefs and councilors to the sachem). The murderer became instantly popular for the deed and was now undermining the authority of Tontonimo. Tontonimo had to refuse to surrender the murderer to save face and to pass the problem on to higher authorities. The dispute was submitted to Governor Webster, and Tontonimo agreed to surrender the murderer. But Weassapano had so many warrior friends that Tontonimo still could not surrender him. The renegades defying Uncas and the English and were quite proud of themselves, just like the Nowashe had been. The English decided they would not trouble themselves further with the quarrel and gave Uncas to understand that he and Tontonimo could solve the problem however they pleased. Uncas realized that Weassapano was becoming a leader of renegades who threatened Tontonimo’s leadership and the tribal peace. Somehow he had to strengthen Tontonimo and discredit the murderer Weassapano.

Uncas assembled a war party to take Weassapano prisoner, but he had no intention of going to battle. Uncas would not have a single warrior die to capture a murderer. His Mohegan war party marched through Bolton Notch and met the renegades near the Hockanum River. Uncas showed his disappointment that so many Podunk warriors were ignoring the Indian ways and showing so little respect for the sagamores. He put the burden of the consequences directly on the renegades and recognized only Tontonimo as the Podunk leader, instructing the renegades to take a message back to Tontonimo. If Tontonimo continued to shelter the murderer, then Uncas would send for the Mohawk to destroy Tontonimo and the entire Podunk tribe.

There is a Mohegan saying, "It is easy to be brave from a distance." The Podunk renegades suddenly had lost that distance. The Nowashe survivors were still trembling and telling stories of the horror of the Mohawk attack. Weassapano now lost popularity with everyone. Tontonimo went along with Uncas's strategy and reinforced the concerns of the Podunks, telling everyone who would listen that Weassapano and the renegades had put every Nowaas and Nowashe survivor's life in jeopardy.

A few weeks later Uncas shrewdly sent a warrior with Mohawk weapons to the Podunk lands, where he set fire to a wigwam near the fort and escaped across the river, leaving behind some Mohawk artifacts. In the morning, when the Podunk came out of their fort to examine the ruins, they found the Mohawk weapons. Believing that Uncas had succeeded in fulfilling his threat, and blinded with terror, the Podunk now pleaded with Tontonimo to surrender Weassapano and to ask for peace.

After sufficient begging for forgiveness, peace was granted by Uncas, and from that time until the King Philip War, the Podunk remained a good tribal neighbor.

 
 
 

The Traditional Mohegan Tribe?

 

 

 

 

What is this name Mohegan and where did it come from?

 

I need to start out with some boring statistics to lay the ground work like

” in the beginning”.

Most people believe that American natives chased their food souse mainly the woolly Mammoth through the Bering straits land bridge and our people came across and down into what are now the Great lakes in the Hudson River valley. Our English name became known as the Monheags.

One of these groups of people became land diggers/farmers; most of the tribes in that area were warring tribes and through time forced this group of Monheag people east.

After some time and many forced movements this group of Monheags ended up along the Quinatucquet River.

Because of years of battles while losing their farms this tribe learned how to fight so when the Mashantuckets, Missituks, Niantic’s, like the Mohawks long ago came to completely destroy and take the farms they, the Monheags did this to them so the  Dutch named them the Pequins the French changed the name to Pequods and the English changed it to Pequot’s.

Are you still with me?

We are almost finished with the boring stuff!

Please remember that all of this was handed down to me from time by my elders while being taught at our monthly meetings while growing up in Uncas village.

When the English showed up on the Quinatucquet River Sachem Wopigwooit was the leader of the tribe,

Because of his passing the people chose Sasscus as leader hoping that he would force the English back into the ocean.

Sasscus like the Niantic’s and the Narragansett’s hated the English and was at war with them constantly.

War chief Uncas Sasscus son in law tried to reason with Sasscus and the people which fell on deaf ears so he took all that wished to go with him over to the Cauchegan village across the Pequot ( Quinatucquet) river and named them by their old name Monheags and became Sachem.

When it became clear that Sachem Sasscus would not rest until the English, Niantic’s, Narragansett’s and all of the surrounding tribes were removed from that land they all came together and completely eliminated the Pequot tribe!

The English changed this river to the Thames River and Sachem Uncas’s people became known as the Mohegan’s.

 

 

Cauchegan Rock

Cochegan rock named by European settlers/Cauchegan Rock the true Mohegan name has been over looked for many years now and I liked it that way.  Cauchegan rock (named after a Mohegan relation family of mine that first lived in the village) is the largest rock in Mohegan land.

The unique setting of the rock was the main reason that it was used so often as a meeting place by Uncas and his followers.

In the spring and for most of the summer, the tribe used it and the land around it, for one of their many villages. Often times, the trees would be used where they stood, to form long and roundhouses. The village was surrounded by fresh water for drinking, gardening, washing, etc., while, the nearby Pequot River provided an abundant supply of fish and clams. The Fox River has now been diverted and used elsewhere by housing development!

My Grandfather told me that the tribe would often put tables and chairs on top of Cauchegan rock when they held their meetings. This would also allow them to see anyone coming towards them from great distances, friend or foe. In the colder weather, the tribe would use the rocks and trees in the area to shelter them from the winds. The warmer weather it was a good place for gardening.

The first Pau-was of the new season would begin at the rock with fellowshipping, before going on to the Great River, the Quinatucquet River, to Pau-was with other tribes.

I have always wondered if it would not be more beneficial for one non-profit organization to share this land with other non-profit organizations and all true native elders.

This very sacred land is now being used to help young men learn about and enjoy Mother Earth.

However, every time someone talks to me about their trip to this Sacred Mohegan Land,

the first thing that they mention is the littering. Why not share the land with our elders, as well as with the Cub Scouts, Brownies and Girl Scouts? In this way, more people would be available to help clean it up, and be taught how to show respect for Mother Earth, while keeping it out of the hands of those who would shame Uncas and all of the Ancestors, by turning it into just another tourist attraction.

Attention/Now for an update,

The Sachem Uncas sacred prayer rock village has been turned over to the casino Indians so now we shall see just how long the Ancestors of New England Woodland American Natives beloved Cauchegan Rock village can remain a sacred Mohegan prayer place?

Aquine,

Sachem Walkingfox

 

 

 

 

Tobacco gift

How and when to present a gift of tobacco to an American native?

Any and every time that one wishes to speak with another it should be

honored by a native tobacco (Kicnic-kicnic) gift.

 

Naming Ceremony Protocol

First and the most important thing would be to make sure that you are an American native, to find this out ask an elder.

The traditional way to make a request to receive your American native name is to give a gift of tobacco, as the request is made, to the person you are requesting the name from. You and your family must also plan a meal or "feast" to celebrate after the Naming Ceremony is completed. If others are receiving their names, the covered dishes will be shared.

 

Present a gift of tobacco from your left hand to the left hand of the individual you are wishing to receive a name from this means heart to heart.

 This person should be a person you respect and must be someone who is an American native elder from the nation that you are requesting a name from.

Personally ask if you may make a request of this person, either in person, by phone or e-mail.

Receive this individual's consent to allow you to make a request.

Honor a male and a female with tobacco and request that they stand with you as sponsors at the ceremony. These should be individuals who have made a significant impact in your life and are familiar with that American native nation.

Naming ceremony is held in a prayer circle with a fire, both of which must be properly prepared. (Honor the prayer circle with appropriate attire and attitudes. Regalia should be worn if available.)

Give thanks to the Creator and all the sponsors.

 

 

Welcome to Uncas Elementary School

280 Elizabeth Street Extension

Norwich, Connecticut 06360

860.823.4208

http://www.norwichpublicschools.org/uncas/index.html823.4208



 Our school is named after the first Sachem of the Mohegan Indians, Uncas.  This is Uncas' story, as told by the present leader of the Storey Clan, Walkingfox.  "The Storey Clan is from the Abanaki Algonquin Nation."  --Sachem Rolling Thunder.
    "After Grand Sachem Wopigwooit, who died in 1631, the next Sachem of the Pequot tribe, could have been either Uncas or Sassacus, because of their blood lines.  Most of the tribe wanted the leadership to go to Sassacus, and so it did.  After many years, many wars, and the loss of many young braves of the nation nation of the Pequots, Chief Uncas tried to get Sachem Sassacus to stop the wars and make peace with the white man.
    Chief Uncas tried to explain to his people, that if they continued on this path of war and destruction, they would soon no longer exist.
    So, Chief Uncas took all who wanted to go and moved them across the Pequot River, which is now called the Thames, to the Great Falls of the City of Kings, which is now called Norwich, and named the Clan, the Mohegans.  The name Mohegan means Wolf.  (Shortly after) this time, Uncas became the Grand Sachem of the Mohegans."  
http://www.sachem-uncas.com

 
 
 

 

Sharman, Warlock, Traditional native Medicine man, Oxymoron

 

 

 

 

 

Before/After

I am sure that you have noticed I enjoy talking about the time before first contact “A time before the Europeans came to our country).

Well now is the time for me to start talking about this time called "after first contact, the time after Europeans started to pollute our culture with their culture".

As stated in earlier pages, as a young child growing up in Uncasvillage I spent many of my first years at the feet of most of our elders,

these elders often spoke of their elders reminiscence of the days lone gone now of the time before our first contact with Europeans.

All of the elders spoke of their distaste with so many “wannabe Indians,”

These people calling themselves American natives and stating that they are Sharman Medicine men, this is of course is an oxymoron.

Only after the 70’s and the forming of native casinos have so many non-native people been showing up claiming to be this non-native person!

No person could ever walk into a traditional American native gathering and claim to be a Medicine man,

or at least they should not if there is also a plan to be walking out again!

In the first place you will never know who this Traditional American native Medicine person is unless or until you need one!

Checking the internet you will find hundreds of web sites stating that they are this Sharman (Medicine man) and for some of your hard earned money they will teach you to also be one!

A Traditional American Native Medicine person would never charge, if they wish to stay in the graces of Grandfather (Creator)!

If one were to digs a little farther into their web site you will find out that they are usually not even American native people from Indian country!

Please understand that I mean no disrespect to the religious people over in the old soviet bloc and the Asia countries that have been practicing their Shamanism for century's now, a religion not to be confused with our American native Spirituality.

They, the shamans of those countries are more they likely laughing at just how ridicules’ the people in this country are for claiming to be and believing in our phony statements!

I am just stating the fact that a Shaman and a Medicine man are not and never will be one in the same for many reasons!

1st An American native Medicine person must be appointed by Creator.

2nd An American native Medicine person must have been taught throughout a life time by a gifted American native elder not like this Eagle person or anyone else that takes gifts.

Please note and except my deepest apologies however, because of many hits from many other countries

 I also included Asia countries!

 

 

 

 

Although Star Spider Dancing has crossed over

her words of wisdom are as true today as it was

for all of our ancestors.

http://www.ewebtribe.com/NACulture/sacred.htm

 

 

 

What is Shamanism?

The religion of the ancient peoples of northern Europe and Asia, A shaman is one who goes into an altered state of consciousness at will. While in this altered state, he or she makes a conscious choice to journey to another reality. A term that comes from a Siberian tribal word for its practitioners: "shaman" (pronounced SHAH-mahn).

 

 

 

  

Shamanism, New and Old

An excellent and special article on this subject, which explains in great detail the meaning/origin of "shaman" and why it is a serious error to use this term in relation to American Indian medicine people, healers, spiritual leaders. Written by Jack Forbes, professor emeritus and former chair of Native American Studies at the University of California at Davis, where he has served since 1969. He is of Powhatan-RenŠpe, Delaware-LenŠpe and other background. In 1960-61 he developed proposals for Native American Studies programs and for an indigenous university. In l971 the D-Q University came into being as a result of that proposal

Sorry that some of her links are down however I for one understand why,

the ones that are still working are great information sites!

 

The circle belongs to the Creator

The job of every Sachem is to serve the people.

The job of all the people is to just get along, fear Creator.

Creator must be in every American circle, if not then the circle will crumble!

 

The Siberian and Mongolian indigenous peoples, the universe is conceived as a living ... "The word shaman comes from the language of the Evenk

 

http://www.shamana.co.uk/siberian_shamanism/index.html

 

Often there is impossible to become a shaman without having shamans-ancestors

 

Shamanism in Siberia excerpts from Aboriginal Siberia

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch_doctor

 

Witches and wizards

http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Wa-Z/Witches-and-Wizards.html

Dangerous Women, Deadly Words

http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=885

 

witch-doctors, a set of quacks, who pretend to cure diseases inflicted by the devil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a very intense gathering ceremony

 some of my Clan Mothers asked me to explain

more about the pipe ceremony.

 

Usually one would not do so in public however,

 after many questions as to why people are now

 doing so through-out the internet

I decided to write this from my heart.

Because I am trying to please two of my elders

 

(The Matriarch’s of my people).

 

Elders please bear with me for a moment!

In Indian country this is about Native American Pipes.

I have been to almost if not all American Native

 People through-out Indian country during

my 66 years and at no time

(While visiting Traditional Natives)

 Would one ever see a show

and tell pipe ceremony?

 

 NEVER!

 

 

1st we should talk about the most famous pipe

of all, the Hollywood pipe (peace pipe).

This is the pipe we have seen on Television since

the television first came on line.

After each and every battle in a movie the

white hat would demand this peace pipe!

 

 

2nd the Friendship pipe

A pipe used mostly in an Eastern Woodland society

for welcoming someone to their village, or

thanking someone, or just plain being friendly.

 

Sacred pipe

A pipe used in all Native American Ceremony’s.

 

Not to be discussed in public only because

the prayers while using this pipe are between

the holder and Grandfather (Creator).

 

The western Native societies (nations) use

this very Special pipe and the non-natives

have shortened its use

to call it a peace pipe.

 

Peace pipe, as explained earlier is

a pipe used by Hollywood mostly to make

the movies look better, usually

this made the Indians look foolish.

however, the point in my story was that

no pipe should be disrespected at any

time anywhere and never to be

performed (show and tell) for the public!

 

We, the children of the Creator can bless NOTHING,

the best that we can do is make ready for our

Creator to come do the blessing.

 

AHO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The word squawb (Squaw) is an old American native word that means one that carries our children, or great one.

If I or any elder called you (A women) a Squaw you should blush with pride!

Now, thanks to past ridicule from non natives and our American native greed for the non native ways and lack of concern, that word would bring horror, anger and contempt for me or that elder  from you, why?  American woodland natives please let us get back to the Creator, our ancestors and the old ways.

 

 A touch of culture for our youth!

 After seeing to the posting of the American and POW/MIA flags after grand entry at

Chief Wodi- Eagle’s powwow and just about to get into my prayer

to our missing brothers & sisters when something caught my eyes.

 

Outside of the circle in a wheel chair was a WWII Veteran.

 

My elders taught me to walk over to an elder that can no longer dance, Dancing Feather salute that elder and ask for permission to dance the veterans dance in their place!

 

My younger brothers & sisters, before you start any dance, look around the circle, if you see an elder, ask for the permission to dance for that elder, I am no longer sure just who gets the most out of that dance, my elder or myself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone selling or gifting a pipe anywhere at any time and calling it a Sacred Pipe is an Apple, Wasichu, Wachecho Shaman. , Coyote, Trickster, witch or Warlock, anything except an American Native!

 

 

 

I was taught from birth that a sacred pipe ceremony was 2nd only to a Burial ceremony and should not be done when non American Natives are present? Casino tribal spiritual leader the one with turkey feathers and Plains Indian regalia should know that it is O K to gift a pipe and I guess the new Casino Indians can give what they wish to give however, once this pipe is awakened to the creator only a real American Native is allowed to touch this pipe, a Caucasian person cannot use let alone own an awakened pipe!

I am pleased that the Queen has returned one of our ancestors to Uncas village and Chief Mahomet Weyonomon should have a real traditional burial and that this Queen should receive a gift however, please let it be a correct gift!

 

 

 

While I am at it there is only one correct way for a non member

of an American native nation to find out just who the

Medicine man of that nation is,

 BY ACCEDENT!

I am getting so tired of witches, warlocks and Shamanism

attempt to become Medicine men or women,

not ever going to happen!

 

 

 

 

Aquine

"Respect should be given those indigenous nations who still carry on their ceremonies; still following the ancient laws of nature with songs and ceremonies."  --Oren R. Lyons, Spokesman, Traditional Circle of Elders Many of our Tribes still have the ceremonies, songs and traditions. Today, the ceremonies and songs are coming back even stronger. The Elders have a lot of this knowledge. The young people need to learn these songs and traditions from the Elders. This is the strength of the people. The ancient Wisdom and Knowledge of ancient Laws are hidden in the ceremonies and songs. We should seek out these songs and ceremonies. 

Great Spirit, teach me the songs and ceremonies. Make my eyes open to see. The circle belongs to the Creator  The job of every Sachem is to serve the people. The job for all of the people is to just get along. Our Creator must be in every circle, if not then the circle will crumble

 

 

 

Because of so many inquiries as to just what is

this word AQUINE,

 I am placing our answer on my web sites.

Just like the word Aquai this is a Pequot/Mohegan

word used time and time again by my elders, now ancestors.

While growing on my reservation Uncasvillage,

there were never more than 13 families teaching our history

However, we were taught our language correctly!

Aquine is something like an Algonquin word Aquene and means PEACE or

 I am a friend I come in peace, while using this word one would have

both arms out about heart high and hands palm down,

this was to show everyone you have no weapon!

Because we have no word of good-by we use the same word Aquine

while on our way, this time with left hand starting from

 the heart palm up straight out heart high.

The Pequot/Mohegan word AQUAI means hello, while meeting someone

 in passing a friendly Aquai on your way by.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Your power comes from the songs."

--Ethel Wilson, COWICHAN

If you do not know any of the songs, ask an Elder to teach you. Get yourself a drum. When you sing a song and play the drum, you'll be surprised how your mind, body, and spirit will react. Everything becomes calm and joyful. Our bodies love the songs. The songs allow us to touch the hand of the Creator. When we sing and touch the Great Spirit's hand, He gives us power. Songs are another way to pray.

My Grandfather, teach me a song today.

.

 

"For me, the essence of a medicine man's life is to be humble, to have great patience, to be close to the Earth, to live as simply as possible, and to never stop learning."

--Archie Fir Lame Deer, LAKOTA

The Medicine people focus on their Being, not their doing. After all, we are human beings not human doings. The Medicine people are very patient and consciously trying to live a live of humility. Medicine people are servant leaders. Their main purpose is to serve the needs of others. By this service attitude, they become the leaders people listen to and the leaders the people want to follow. The Medicine people say everyone is their teacher. Maybe we should try to live this way ourselves; humble, patient, honoring the Earth and listening to our teachers.

Grandfather, today, let me know all people are my teachers and I am the student.

 



 

 

 

 

Our ancestors knew Grandfather is the Creator of everything.

In the Jewish or old testament Moses ask Grandfather what his name was and Creator said

 “I AM”!

Back before first contact our people held a Paw-paus for each of our seasons.

In recent years the name was changed to Pow-Wow.

At each of the seasons we would set ourselves up around in a circle, share food, clothing and stories for a few days and then pray for Grandfather and our ancestors to come join us in prayer and dance because we made it through another season.

If we did not pray, share and fellowship creator would not come!

No Grandfather (Creator) no protection from the trickster, no love, no joy and no ancestors!

If our people have a Pow-Wow (Pau-Paus) and do not stick completely to the old ways strange things happen, strange people start showing up in the circle and many things keep going wrong!

“SO NO PAU-PAUS”

Then why have a circle in the first place?

Elders our ancestors charge you with teaching our people a true paw-paus.

If you cannot teach please find an elder and learn, remember we the elders will answer in our next walk!

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

The Mohegan People of Connecticut

 

Just who are the American native eastern woodland Mohegan people and where did they come from?

Scholars, archeologists, anthropologists and just plain people have been trying to trace my people the Mohegan’s for years now.

I believe most would agree to start someplace in the middle east or the middle of Africa, this is the place that is agree on as the start of our life as we now know it.

Religion set aside for now only so that I may make the point of where my people got that name, many now believe that their ancestors followed the food chain across the Striates (what was then a land bridge between what is now Russia & Alaska) across (what is now Canada) and then our people continued down into what is now called the Great Lakes in upper New York Lower Canada.

My ancestors, a part of the (Monheags) Mohican people, after some time became closer to Mother Earth as farmers; they became so good at farming that other villages wanted their land and pushed them all the way across the land and over what we call the Pequot river (Thames River).

After so many years of being beat up and pushed around, our people finely learned how to fight back, so when the villages of this new land started pushing my people pushed back and pushed back so well they ended up with all of the land!

When the Europeans showed up and stated pushing they pushed back and pushed so hard that the Europeans called our ancestors the Piquet’s (destroyers), later the English changer the name to Pequot’s.

When Grand Sachem Wopigwooit, one of many of our peace loving Sachem’s, died in 1631

(there should never be a vote of the people)

however, two names came up as too who should be the next sachem, Uncas had seniority and the blood line and Sassacus wanted war so he (Sassacus) became the next Sachem of the Pequot people?

After many years, many wars and the loss of so many young braves of the Pequot people, Uncas, now war chief, tried to get Sachem Sassacus to stop the wars and try peace with the Europeans and neighboring tribes.

As Uncas explained, every time the Europeans lost a warrior, ten more would come to fight in his place; the Pequot’s had no replacements and would soon no longer exist. The trickster (Coyote, Satan) blinded the eyes of Sassacus and most of the Pequot people so Uncas took all that wished to go over the Pequot river to what is now called the Great falls and changed the name back to Mohican.

This group of his people asked Uncas to take his rightful place as Sachem of this group of Mohican. Martha, his wife, had one husband, Uncas as Sachem had many wives.

Now because it this Sassacus considered Uncas and his people to be just another of his many enemy so the Pequot’s immediately attacked this group across the river at a place now known as Fort Shantok park named after one of the Mohican braves that held off this brutal attack from their relatives.

Eventually the Europeans and all of the Pequot neighboring tribes soon grew so tired of this constant fighting that they joined forces and

regardless of what you now read in the papers or from some people

completely decimated the entire Pequot nation!

It was at this time that Uncas became the Grand Sachem of all of the people.

Because of new wars with the Narragansett’s (who many time were much more brutal to the peace loving smaller tribes then the old Pequot tribe) Uncas moved a small band of non-royal mixed clan of his new tribe and settled them as lookouts in the area now known as Fort Shantok. As usual the European’s began misspelling the name of our people and started calling them

Mohegan’s.

http://www.sachem-uncas.com/villages.html

As Paul Harvey liked to say,

“Now you know the rest of the story”. As told to me by our Elders --“AHO”

 

 

 

 

 

O K I may need to go through this once again before you read the following article.

In an Eastern Woodland American Native Society (a Matriarch Society) the Sachem is the ruler of the people.

This person is born into the Royal family no one can vote for a Sachem.

This person male or Female can designate anyone of his people as chief and that person will be a chief for as long as the Sachem needs that person to be chief of a job for the tribe.

Each tribe has a number of clan mothers with one chosen by the Sachem as head Clan Mother.

The tribe also has a council of Elders and this council is set up and run by the clan mothers.

Now the entire tribe collects and hands over everything to their Sachem, then the Sachem distributes everything through-out the tribe!

Once everything is evenly distributed the Sachem and family must rely on the tribe for the families care and comfort!

This has a tendency to have a very good Sachem.

 

Prior to her death on July 15, 1929,and because he was the next in line Alice Melinda Storey/Tracy Fielding appointed William James Storey to be Sachem Tallfox and her choice to rule  the Mohegan’s.

Alice Storey/Tracy Fielding was at that time known as the Princess (Sachem) of the Mohegan’s, and is a direct descendant of Uncas, acknowledged leader of the Mohegan Indian Tribe during the "Pequot War" of 1637, and thereafter. This title was affirmed as "Sachem for Life" by the Officers of Tribal Council of Mohegan Indians and on November 18, 1933 Sachem Tallfox appointed his cousin John Hamilton  as his War Chief of land claims and this was  recognized and supported by the Mohegan’s, including Courtland Fowler, from 1933 through the 1960s.

In the late 1960s, War Chief Hamilton was authorized by the Council of Descendants of Mohegan Indians to act on its behalf in matters pertaining to the relations between the Mohegan Indian Tribe and the State of Connecticut. At that time, Fowler served on the Council under war chief John Hamilton.

In 1970, a faction of Mohegan’s became dissatisfied with the prospects of the Mohegan Indian Tribe filing a land claim suit against the tribe’s neighbors so at an unofficial Council meeting in May 1970, sought to elect a new leader of the Mohegan Tribe?

War Chief Hamilton rejected the asserted authority of the Council to replace him so he and his followers left the meeting.

The remaining Mohegan Indians and non Indians at the meeting elected Courtland Fowler as their leader?

The total number of people casting votes was fewer than 10 according to public statements made by Courtland Fowler.

Fewer than 10 people tried to overthrew the Sachems Constitutional government and leadership tradition older than recorded history and leave the majority of Mohegan’s out.

Despite this separation however, from the 1970s until 1994, no Mohegan Indian was excluded from participation in traditional practices, events or ceremonies by virtue of association with either the Storey/Hamilton or Fowler faction of Mohegan Indians.

War Chief Hamilton continued to pursue a land claim suit on behalf of the Mohegan Tribe, and retained counsel for the purpose of prosecuting the land claim suit.

In 1977, "The Mohegan Tribe," acting through War Chief Hamilton, filed a land claim suit in federal district court in Connecticut against the State of Connecticut, asserting that aboriginal and historic claims and titles to over 2,000 acres in Montville, Connecticut had been extinguished in violation of the Non-Intercourse Act.

War Chief Hamilton further filed a notice with the Bureau of Indian Affairs ("BIA") seeking federal acknowledgment of "The Mohegan Tribe" in 1978. Both the land claim suit and the acknowledgment petition were filed on behalf of the Mohegan Tribe by Attorney Jerome Griner, who had been retained by Hamilton under his authority as Chief of Land claims.

From May 1970 through 1979, the Fowler faction continued to actively and publicly oppose both the land claim suit and the federal acknowledgment petition. From 1979 to 1981, the Fowler faction organized an entity called the "Mohegan Tribal Council" and adopted a constitution for its governance in 1980. At around this time, Attorney Griner, counsel of record for the Mohegan Tribe in the land claim suit and the federal acknowledgment petition, ceased accepting direction from Chief Hamilton and instead began to take direction from the Fowler faction, without notifying either the federal court or the BIA of his change in clients. WHY?

Upon discovering that Attorney Griner had begun to serve the interests of the Fowler faction in 1981, Hamilton discharged him and retained separate counsel from Attorney Robert Cohen. Although the State raised the issue of the propriety of filings by two attorneys on behalf of "The Mohegan Tribe" in the land claim suit when Cohen filed his appearance in 1981 and then later in 1989, the issue of authorization for the filings of Griner and Cohen was never resolved by the district court.

The Fowler faction amended its constitution in 1984 and renamed itself the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut ("MTIC").

In 1985, Attorney Griner filed detailed documentation before the BIA in support of the 1978 acknowledgment petition on behalf of "The Mohegan Tribe, petitioner." Griner submitted an MTIC membership roll of 1,017 members, claiming that this roll relied on lists of Mohegan Indians prepared by the State of Connecticut. The BIA then placed the petition under "active consideration."

Also in 1985, the State of Connecticut filed a formal opposition to federal acknowledgment with the BIA, characterizing Hamilton and his followers and the Fowler group as two factions of a single, unitary Mohegan Tribe. In support of this position, the State relied on a 1979 letter from a member of the Fowler faction stating that "‘they do not have a tribal organization because they are going to organize to form a tribal group for the sole purpose of combating War Chief John Hamilton.’"

In November 1989, the BIA announced its proposed decision that the United States would not acknowledge the Mohegan Tribe, based on its finding that from 1941 to the date of the rejection, the Mohegan Tribe did not demonstrate sufficient social community or sufficient political authority and influence as required under 25 CPR 83.7 (b) and (c). The BIA did not examine the files and records of Hamilton or the Council prior to issuing the proposed rejection. In 1990, Cohen submitted a response to the BIA pointing out that the BIA had never examined these files, and in which he narrated the internal leadership and external political and land claim efforts of Hamilton from 1941 until his death in 1988.

Because of the crossing of War Chief Hamilton and the crossing in 1986 of Sachem Tallfox’s last living son Sachem Zeak, Clarence J Storey,  another Mohegan tribal faction started under the leadership of Eleanor Fortin The Secretary/driver of War Chief John E Hamilton.

The Mohegan Tribe and Nation is an incorporated tribal organization representing the interests of its membership, Native Americans of Mohegan ancestry, community and traditions, The Mohegan Tribe and Nation’s membership consists of the living descendants of the aboriginal Mohegan Indian Tribe who are followers of the Mohegan land claims.

 
 
 
 

American Native Spirituality

 

 

“Spirituality is not religion.

Speaking in the name of religion is a good way to assure a battle. Religion, since the

beginning of time has always been a way to pit humans against each other. In the

name of my God, I take your life your land and your wampum. In the name of Allah or

God or whatever, it has been an excuse for a dominating country or race to make

 servants out of smaller, less populated races or countries.

In the Creator's eyes, we are all servants of the master. We need to spend more time

learning how to serve the Creator and less time trying to make servants out of our

fellow man. The more we learn to serve the Creator, the better everyone's life on

Mother Earth will b”e. Simply put, “Creator created ALL”.

Creator is always right everyone else is always wrong, so follow Creator”!

 

 

 

 

 

Before 1st contact there were well over 1,000 American native tribes in Indian country,

there are still over 500 tribes (Nations) through-out Indian country and ever though

each has its own way of going about it they are all very spiritual and no American

Native would have a problem praying with-in any other nation un-like the Europeans.

Our faith is in Creator, many tribes have their way of getting to it however, they all

 believe that Creator made Mother Earth and placed us on her she is our mother

and cares for us. An American native believe that we can and do pray

anywhere and everywhere, we do not have a book or a leader to help us talk with

 Creator. Many American natives carry a prayer pouch or tobacco bag

however; this is to help remind others to pray. This pouch carries our medicine and is

extremely sacred and should never be touched by an unknown or non believer!

 

 

 

"Spirituality is not religion to American Natives.

Religion is not a Native concept, it is a non Native word,

with implications of things that often end badly,

like Holy wars in the name of individuals God's and so on.

Native people do not ask what religion another Native is,

because they already know the answer.

To Native people, spirituality is about the Creator, period~"

                                          

 
 
 

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